Tuesday, June 29, 2010

Review: A Short Second Life of Bree Tanner by Stephenie Meyer

The Short Second Life of Bree Tanner: An Eclipse Novella The Short Second Life of Bree Tanner: An Eclipse Novella by Stephenie Meyer


My rating: 4 of 5 stars
I just had to read this book in preparation for the release of Eclipse in a few days! It was perfect timing on behalf of Stephenie Meyer to write and release this book. It does explain things through a different set of eyes and makes me a little more sympathetic to Bree's plight. I would have now hoped for a better ending for her. She takes it all in stride though and is a very honorable vampire newborn. I sensed a tenderness in her even though she was a very vile creation. Reading this book also helped me to see just how evil Victoria really is and how much more I really don't like Jane.

I am really looking forward to the release of Eclipse and even more so for Breaking Dawn. I just don't want it all to ever end, which inevitably, it must.

I would like to once again thank my students (especially Mindi) for encouraging me to read this series and once again renew my love for reading. Had it not been for the combination, this blog would not be in existence and I would be spending my time doing something totally boring, I'm sure.

View all my reviews >>

I purchased this book in anticipation of the upcoming release of Eclipse.

Bookmark and Share

Teaser Tuesday

Teaser Tuesdays is hosted by MizB over at Should Be Reading.

TEASER TUESDAYS asks you to:

Grab your current read. Let the book fall open to a random page.

Share with us two (2) “teaser” sentences from that page, somewhere between lines 7 and 12.
You also need to share the title of the book that you’re getting your “teaser” from … that way people can have some great book recommendations if they like the teaser you’ve given!

Please avoid spoilers!!

I could use some reading material.


Taken from The Short Second Life of Bree Tanner by Stephenie Meyer.

Bree is a vampire girl after my own heart!! She loves to read!! :) I am anxiously awaiting the release of Eclipse on Wednesday night/Thursday morning! I am trying to catch up on all of my Twilight reading before then. This is a great book and I'll post a review later. I love how SM took the time to write about Bree Tanner and give us a glimpse in the life of the newborn!

TEAM EDWARD!!!!! :) :) :)

Bookmark and Share

Monday, June 28, 2010

Review: Against Medical Advice by James Patterson and Hal Friedman

Against Medical Advice: A True Story Against Medical Advice: A True Story by James Patterson



This harrowing tale of Cory Friedman's life is one that I recommend all to read. The story, told from Cory's perspective, deals with his life with Tourette's and OCD. I cannot imagine how this life must have been for this young man! Knowing at a young age that he was different, it's not long before Cory starts ticing and doing abnormal things that cause him and his family embarrassment.

This should be a must read for ALL teachers and parents. The Friedman's have really demonstrated the true unconditional love of a parent. They never turned their backs on Cory and fully supported him through his trials. They stuck by him when most people would have run or placed him in a home. I'm absolutely detested at the teachers in this story who had no faith in Cory or his abilities. Such cold hearted people to be that way! I'm a high school teacher and have had at least 3 students with Tourette's come through my program. They are amongst the smartest people I know, they just need a little extra time.

I sincerely hope that this was truly Cory's story, as we are told it is and that James Patterson merely served as an editor more than a writer of this story. Don't get me wrong, I love James Patterson's work but this really needs to be Cory's story...his words, thoughts, and ideas. I would also hope that Mr. Patterson would donate a portion of the proceeds of this book to the Tourette's Foundation, but I did not see any sort of clause as such in the book.

When you think your life is bad, pick up a book such as this and see that some people are literally living a nightmare and can't do anything about it. Kudos to the Friedman's (including Jessie) for standing by Cory's side and never giving up. They are truly heroes in my book!

View all my reviews >>

I purchased this book awhile back.

Bookmark and Share

Mailbox Monday





Mailbox Monday is hosted by Marcia at The Printed Page each Monday so that other book lovers and bloggers can see and comment on what's in the mailbox. Thanks Marcia for a great way of posting our new (or new to us) books!!

Have you read a book on my list? Please comment on it. It's possible I will use your comment and link back to you when I post my review of a particular book!

To Review:
One Season of Sunshine by Julia London
Nightshade by Ronie Kendig

Purchased:
--

Other:
Negotiator by Dee Henderson (via paperbackswap)
Fatal by Michael Palmer (via paperbackswap)
The Shack by William P. Young (via paperbackswap)


What's in your box this week?

Bookmark and Share

Friday, June 25, 2010

FIRST: Victory Song by Jeri Doner

It is time for a FIRST Wild Card Tour book review! If you wish to join the FIRST blog alliance, just click the button. We are a group of reviewers who tour Christian books. A Wild Card post includes a brief bio of the author and a full chapter from each book toured. The reason it is called a FIRST Wild Card Tour is that you never know if the book will be fiction, non~fiction, for young, or for old...or for somewhere in between! Enjoy your free peek into the book!



You never know when I might play a wild card on you!





Today's Wild Card author is:





and the book:



Victory Song

Three Paths Publishing; 1st edition (May 7, 2007)

***Special thanks to Ruth Doner O'Neil for sending me a review copy.***



ABOUT THE AUTHOR:








Jeri Doner was an active member of the North-South-Skirmish-Association for over twenty years. This sparked her interest in the 149th NYVI of the Civil War. She is the mother of four children and has seven grandchildren. She was an avid seamstress often making reproduction gowns and uniforms from the Civil War time period. Her love of writing and history led to the novel Victory Song.





Visit the publisher's website.



Product Details:



List Price: $14.95

Paperback: 284 pages

Publisher: Three Paths Publishing; 1st edition (May 7, 2007)

Language: English

ISBN-10: 0978933737

ISBN-13: 978-0978933739



AND NOW...THE FIRST CHAPTER:





It was not a good time to be leaving that was certain. His mother said so often enough. She never missed a chance to remind him of the harvest, that it was a monumental task at best. It would be almost too much for one aging farmer and a sixteen-year-old boy. He half listened. There was always too much work, and that was not going to change. He knew his father was not getting any younger, and his brother, Peter, was not doing well in school. He knew that his mother’s work had increased since his big sister, Lydia, had married and moved to her husband’s home.



Andy had always been the bright one, the strong one, and the reliable one. He was tired of it. He had listened eagerly to the army recruiters, and read all the patriotic articles in the newspapers. They had promised much in the way of adventure, glory, and victory. They had called for the people to sacrifice for the good of the country. While the war might seem remote and irrelevant to the rest of the Richardson family, it was very real to Andy. He wanted a part in it. He had heard all the colorful words until they circled continually in his mind. Adventure. Glory. Victory. Sacrifice. He admitted only to himself that the most prominent and appealing word of all was none of those. It was the word that had become the theme of his existence, his prayer and constant desire. Escape.



He did not feel guilty about leaving the milking chores on this last day of boyhood. His father did not approve of his enlisting in the army, but he had given permission for him to have this time for himself. If they could get by without him tomorrow, they could just as easily begin managing today, the old man had said. It was his stern way of expressing that, though he disapproved, he was trying to understand.



Andy wandered along the windbreak at the edge of a field, enjoying for the last time the peacefulness of the land, which had been his lifelong home. He let the slope of the ground carry him down toward the brook where the cattle were watered. Many a summer day had been spent fishing in that stream. Through a tangle of brush, he located the well-worn path, which led to the swimming hole. A stout rope was still suspended from an overhanging branch. It had been the most important thing in his world the year he and his best friend, Eddie, had hung it there. The water was still now, for Eddie had moved away to distant Auburn, and Andy had grown up. Not many splashes were heard in the old swimming hole these days. This summer of 1862 had been an uncommonly dry one, and the water level was low.



Childhood was a thing of the past, Andy told himself. Only one day separated him from manhood and a life of his own. In the morning he was leaving for Syracuse to be mustered into the 149th New York Infantry Regiment, and the farm boy life would be over. For now he could afford to stop resenting the confines of the farm, the dullness of life here, and the everlasting chores. He could simply meander about enjoying his surroundings.



There were things to enjoy here. September in central New York was a brightly busy time. The heat of summer was, for the most part, past. Though there was still an occasional hot day or two, the air more often than not held a chill that warned of winter’s inevitable approach. The southwest breeze blew about industrious honeybees as they salvaged the last useful specks from brilliant goldenrod blossoms. Gray squirrels that had been summer-sleek were now fall-fluffy, romping with their abundance of hickory nuts and black walnuts. The stately maples had not yet reached their peak of color, but lacy sumac fairly blazed from every neglected hedgerow and patch of wasteland. Fruit trees were heavy with spring promises kept. Pale Queen-Anne’s lace and blue chicory cushioned the fall of ripening apples, pears, and plums. The hills lay in gentle folds, no longer green, but gold and brown awaiting the scythe.



Andy had circled back toward the house, and could see a horse saddled and hitched to the fence in the side yard. He felt a sudden excitement upon recognizing it as his Aunt Jen’s. She was one of the few people he would miss. As he neared the door, he mentally braced himself, anticipating that because of Aunt Jen’s presence he was about to walk into a roomful of tension.







“He’s leaving, Callie, and there’s nothing more to be done about it. You’ll have to face the fact.” The voice was raspy with age, edged with impatience.



Callie Richardson looked up from the pot of apple butter she had been stirring, and eyed her sister-in-law across the steamy summer kitchen. “I’m trying to make the most of this, Jen, and I don’t need you to tell me what I already know. I just can’t feel the way you do about it. I think he’s making a big mistake.”



“Don’t you read the papers, girl?” Jen asked. “There’s a war going on in this country. The worst kind of a war. Tearing the country apart. And your son is going for a soldier in Mr. Lincoln’s army. Can’t you be proud of him?”



“I am. In my own way. But he’s needed here at home. He never gave that a thought when he signed up.”



“Pete is sixteen. It’s time he did his share around here. Andy did at that age.”



“Pete is not Andy,” the mother replied. “He needs more time with his school work. He tries his best, but he can’t keep up like Andy did.”



“That’s not Andy’s fault,” Jen pointed out. “He’d be leaving home one of these days, no matter what. If it weren’t for the war it would be for something else. You know I’m right, Callie.”



Callie’s brow was moist, and so were her eyes. She wiped her face on her apron. “I know, Jen. But you really can’t understand. He’s not your son.”



“He’s my brother’s. And since I never had a family of my own, he’s as close to being mine as anyone can be. It’s not a secret Andy was always my favorite. I’ll miss him something awful, but I’d never try to keep him from going. He’s nineteen. He’s not a child.”



Callie decided the apple butter had cooked long enough, and lifted the heavy kettle from the stove. She moved to the wooden table in the middle of the room and set it down a little harder than necessary. “I suppose I wouldn’t mind so much if he just wasn’t going with that Henry Birch. That boy worries me.”



“Oh, they’ll be all right!” Jen tried to assure her. “I thought you liked Mrs. Birch. Don’t they go to your church?”



“They did years ago. They’ve been to all different churches since then. Never satisfied. I don’t see Henry’s mother any more. But hear plenty about him. He’s a wild one. I don’t like Andy with him.”



“It’s time you started trusting Andy. He’s a grown man, and your job of raising him is over. You’ve given him a proper Christian upbringing, and that’s all you can do. Besides, I hear that Captain Townsend that was recruiting in Elbridge was some kind of a preacher in civilian life. He was a chaplain in the cavalry before he resigned to raise a company for the Fourth Onondagas. That’s whose company they’ll be in, isn’t it?”



“Yes…that gives me some comfort,” Callie admitted. “But I still worry that he’ll turn out like that good-for-nothing Henry.”



“Or like me?” Jen asked.



Callie let the exasperation show on her face. Something was wrong here. She was a Godly woman, but it was Jen’s total honesty that made her the most uncomfortable. It was hard enough making polite conversation after all the differences they had suffered over the years. She did not know how to respond to this. Jen was the undisputed black sheep of the Richardson family, having rejected the strict moral standards of the rest of the clan. She was a painfully honest woman, and occasionally used some colorful language to tell her relatives what she thought of the way they pressured their children to conform. She was a true non-conformist, dressing as she pleased, coming and going bareheaded in the streets at all hours. She commonly hung laundry out on Sunday, read scandalous novels, and it was said she used alcohol to relieve a chronic cough. Callie wondered once or twice if the cough could have been the result of the use of tobacco, but that seemed rather outrageous, even for Jen. It was true she found it easy to disapprove of the old woman, and the more she gave voice to her disapproval, the more Andy seemed to admire his aunt. Perhaps he would turn out like her, a religious agnostic and a social outcast. There was nothing wrong with wanting more for him than that.



Before Callie had a chance to think of anything to say, the front door banged and loud footsteps came through the house toward the summer kitchen.



“What’s cooking?” Andy’s voice called. “It smells great in here!”



Both mother and aunt turned toward the doorway as he entered. His gray-green eyes blinked as he tried to hurry the adjustment from outdoor sunlight to the dimness of the room.



“Aunt Jen! Glad you came over,” he said, looking with satisfaction at the old woman sitting near the table. “I figured on coming over to your place tonight to say good-bye.”



“You’re a fine one!” Jen scolded playfully. “I come visiting and you’re off someplace!”



“I just went for a walk in the woods and down by the old swimming hole. Wanted to see it once more before I leave. Water sure is low this year.” Having discovered the apple butter, he cut a generous slice of bread from a loaf on the sideboard and sat down on the edge of the table to dip it into the steaming kettle.



“Get out of there!” Callie chided, swatting him on the thigh with a dishtowel to remove him from the table. “You know better than that!”



“How come you’re making this stuff when it’s so hot out?” He asked with his mouth full. “Apples ‘ll keep till cold weather.”



“Because it’s your favorite, and what I made last year is all gone,” the mother replied.



“Mom, you didn’t have to do that.” He tried to sound grateful, but suspected that she was too busy or too tired to notice.



“When you were gone so long I thought you walked into Canton to good-bye to somebody,” she said.



“I said all my farewells Sunday,” he told her. “And it’s Memphis, not Canton.”



It seemed he was forever correcting her about that. The nearest village was always called Canton, short for Canal Town, and that word best described the little settlement. A year ago, for some obscure reason, the name had been changed to Memphis. Andy had no trouble recalling the new name, and thought his parents should have been able to keep it in mind, too coming as it did from the Bible. He would never understand how older people could bring to mind lengthy passages from their favorite book, quoting chapter and verse without error, and not recall that they were members of the First Baptist Church of Memphis, not Canton. The inconsistency baffled him; if that was a characteristic of old age, he hoped never to reach it.



The door banged again, and a familiar voice called, “Mom, we’re finally here. Where do you want the pies?”



“I’ll take care of them,” Andy offered, bounding into the dining room where his sister Lydia was unpacking her contribution to dinner.



“Not a chance, little brother,” she said. “Somebody else might like a taste.”



It was a joke they shared, her calling him a little brother, for she said it looking up into his face as she had been doing for years. Not all Richardsons were tall; when it came to height, Lydia favored Callie, but Andy had inherited all his father’s considerable size and more. While many youngsters experienced a winter of illness sometime during their growing years resulting in a slowed growth rate, Andy had always enjoyed excellent health and an unimpaired appetite for the abundance of good food with which the family had always been blessed. Besides his long, muscular arms and legs, he received from his father a distinctive face, which was easily recognizable in the locality as belonging to a Richardson. The forehead was broad and high, the nose a bit longer than most would consider becoming. The cheekbones were prominent and deeply tanned from exposure to sun and wind. The mouth was the most distinctive feature of all, and the one Andy liked the least. It had a tendency to turn down at the corners, producing a look of immovable sternness on his father’s face. On Aunt Jen the look was one of impudence. On Lydia it was just plain pouty. Andy, when he thought of it, smiled a lot in hopes that the effort would make him look less like the rest of the family.



Callie came in from the summer kitchen to greet her only daughter. The oldest of the three children, Lydia had married the son of a neighboring farmer less than a year ago. She was still much in evidence about the homestead, and especially on important occasions like today.



“Where’s Don?” Callie asked, referring to Lydia’s husband.



“He went down to the barn to meet Daddy and Pete,” the girl explained. “I hope they finish milking soon. I’m starved. Too bad SOME people don’t see fit to help with the chores any more.” With that she nudged Andy in the ribs.



“Before you barged in I was trying to have a nice visit with Aunt Jen.” He said.



Lydia made a face at the mention of the aunt, but dutifully went to the doorway and called, “Hello, Aunt Jen. I hope you’re staying for supper.”



The old woman got to her feet and replied, “No, I got my own food at home. Just came over to see Andy before he goes off tomorrow. Now if you’ll walk me out to my horse, boy, I’ll be on my way and out from under foot.”



They all politely tried to convince her to stay, but she would not be persuaded. Callie and Lydia did not seem overly disappointed when she insisted upon leaving, but Andy was reluctant to walk out into the yard with her.



“I hoped I’d get to see you in your uniform,” Aunt Jen said when they were outside and the commotion left behind.



“We have to go to Syracuse to get all our stuff issued. I don’t know how quick the government can supply us. You’ll have to come to the camp at the fairgrounds to see us in uniform.”



“I ain’t traipsing all the way to Syracuse!” Aunt Jen informed him. “You send me a picture.”



“I’ll try. But I won’t be gone forever. I’ll be over to see you when I get back, and that’s a promise.”



She did not respond except to shake her head sadly. “It won’t be the same here with you gone.”



Andy nodded. “I can’t say I’ll miss everything here, but I sure will miss you, Aunt Jen.”



They had been close, and he thought he knew her as well as anyone alive, but he was surprised when she did something uncharacteristic. She stretched to hug and kiss him. When he lifted her onto her horse she did something else he did not expect. She wept.



“Aunt Jen, I only enlisted for three years. And if we get the Rebels licked before then, I can come back earlier. Please don’t act as if it’s the end of everything.”



She wiped her eyes and cleared her throat as if to speak, but said nothing. She had the unladylike habit of riding astride, and had designed her skirts to accommodate the man’s saddle she used. Once sure of her seat, she slapped the horse on the withers and cantered off down the road.



Andy watched for a while after the dust settled. After a few moments he looked out across the field to see his father, Pete, and Don leaving the barn. They were weary, but walked quickly toward the house, for supper would soon be ready. Andy thought of the same thing, but waited for them to catch up to him so that they could all enter together.



The sun was beginning to fade when he turned back to the old house. It was painted barn red, and looked dark in the shadows. It sat on a hillside, protected from the ferocity of the north wind, its front yard sloping down toward the road, which ran south of it. Light spilled from the kitchen window, along with mingled smells of roasting beef, fresh bread, and the apple butter. Behind the house the kitchen garden looked well used, offering the last of its beans and squash. The corn stalks were brown and dry, holding one another erect against the autumn winds. His eyes followed the road until it twisted out of sight among surrounding maples. It was edged by a split rail fence he had built with his father. Beyond that lay a field newly cultivated this year. Wrestling the stubborn sumac out of the ground had been an ordeal he would not soon forget. He came up to the house and pumped some fresh water up from the well he had helped to dig and keep clean. It was good water, and had proved sufficient for their needs. He took a last look around the place and sighed. While his parents took pride in the home and saw in it a testimony to achievement, Andy saw only backbreaking work—work that would never be done. It was not the sort of life he wanted for himself, and he was excited to think that his escape was only a day in the future.



Please stop by in a few days for my full review of this book. So far, I'm really enjoying it! :)

Bookmark and Share

Thursday, June 24, 2010

Nightlight: A Parody by Harvard Lampoon

Nightlight: A Parody of Twilight Nightlight: A Parody of Twilight by Harvard Lampoon


My rating: 3 of 5 stars
I bought this book because I am a fan of Twilight and I wanted to see what take this book would have. It started out great! I loved it! My students kept telling me that I would love the book...especially Edwart's character. It didn't take me long to see why they thought that! I found out that Edwart was a man after my own heart...a germaphobe!! The only difference between Edwart and I is that I despise Purell. The stuff doesn't work people!!! My students test it every year in lab and prove that it doesn't work so save your money!

Ahem...so I need to get back on topic...

I loved this book for the first 100 pages. After that, it just got stupid in my opinion. I mean, why ruin the end of the book? They could have just stopped at page 100 and been done with it but they had to pervert the story to the point of boredom. There were many great scenes and lines (most in my opinion revolved around Edwart and the Purell)but my overall impression is that this book was just ok.

Now back to my countdown of the release of Eclipse!! :)

View all my reviews >>

Bookmark and Share

Wednesday, June 23, 2010

Wrapping Up Wayfarer with an Interview of RJ Anderson

I am honored to have RJ Anderson as a guest on my blog today. The super cool thing is that my students (who inspired me to read in my adult life) have had an opportunity to ask her some questions that she so graciously answered. I was able to squeeze in a couple as well! Thanks so much for stopping by RJ!! I appreciate your time!
1. What inspired you to write this series about fairies?

Originally I just wanted to take the idea of small faeries as inherently "cute" and "sparkly" and turn it on its head, by writing about faeries who had lost their magic and were struggling to survive in the modern world. But once I got into the writing, I realized that what really interested me was the idea of how human beings might appear strange and wonderful to a faery who knew little or nothing about family, community, trust -- things we humans take for granted. That gave me the plot of the first book, Spell Hunter. But there were still a lot of loose ends to deal with after the events of that story, and Wayfarer was meant to address those outstanding issues, and also show how the world of the faeries had been changed by their contact with humanity.

2. How do you choose the personality of your characters? (Especially Knife)

Knife's character came straight out of my desire to write a small faery who was not cute, but fierce and fearless and dangerous despite being only seven inches tall. She started off as a sketch in my notebook when I was sixteen, and then she refused to get out of my head until I'd written her a story.

I'm really not a fanciful or mystical person, but I find that my characters tend to take on a life of their own, and it's my job as the author to listen to what they're telling me about what they would and wouldn't do, think and say. So rather than a systematic approach to character-building that uses notes and lists and questionnaires and so on, my approach tends to be more intuitive. I write a line of dialogue for Knife or Linden and I think, "No, that doesn't feel right, she wouldn't say that," so I delete it and try again until it feels right.

3. What keeps you motivated to write?

It used to be that I would get these fabulous ideas in my mind and I just had to write them down before they drove me crazy. I'd sometimes go months without writing anything, waiting for creative lightning to strike, and then I'd start typing madly for hours and days on end until I got the project done. But I don't have time to wait for that to happen these days, because now I have deadlines. And children. So I have to use boring old self-discipline (and large quantities of tea) to keep myself on track. I set aside time to write every day, and I shut off the Internet during that time, and force myself to write either a certain number of words, or work for a certain number of hours. I try to budget extra time into the schedule in case I get sick or something else unforeseen comes up. And when I get stuck, I pray a lot! It's not always fun -- in fact sometimes it's miserable. But the finished book is worth it.

4. Who inspired you to become a writer?

The authors I read as a child -- C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien, George MacDonald and others. And my father, who read those stories out loud to me and awakened in me a love of fantasy that's lasted my whole life.

5. How many books do you plan to write in this series??? I love them
and hope to read several more in this series or any other series you
choose to write!!

Thank you! I have at least two more faery books coming, Lord willing -- Arrow will be released in the UK on January 6, 2011 and Swift in January 2012. There might be more books beyond that, but we'll see!

SQUEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :)
6. If you could give your readers any advice on life, what would it be?

Don't follow the crowd. Think about what kind of person you really want to be, and what you really want to do with your life, and what you believe in, and stand for those things.

7. If you could have dinner with any one of your characters who would
it be and why?

I think I would choose Knife. She'd have such an interesting and unique perspective as someone who's lived in two very different worlds, and done some exciting (and scary) things, and faced all kinds of challenges.


Thank you so much for your time Rebecca! I have sincerely enjoyed our time together and I look forward to more of your works! In the meantime, please stop by and visit with these other bloggers. You never know what else you might learn about this great book! :)

Whispers of Dawn, The Book Cellar, The Hungry Readers, My Own Little Corner of the World, KidzBookBuzz.com, Reading is My Superpower, Book Crumbs, Becky’s Book Reviews, Fireside Musings, A Christian Worldview of Fiction, Homeschool Book Buzz, Homespun Light, Book Review Maniac

Bookmark and Share

CSFF Blog Tour Day 3: My Thoughts on Imaginary Jesus by Matt Mikalatos




It's time to wrap up this fun tour of Imaginary Jesus by Matt Mikalatos.

Many thanks to the author and publisher for providing a copy of this book to read and review!


I wish I had something funny and witty to say here but I don't because, well, I'm just not funny and witty! I can tell you a little about this book though...

  • You *will* be offended...especially if you find yourself in here (I found myself a few too many times!)
  • You will meet a talking donkey in this book. Her name is Daisy. She's such a smart ass!!
  • You will find at least one Jesus that you know...and several others that you are acquainted with (hey wait a minute, I thought there was only one!?!?!?)
  • You will get a great visual depiction of the President in tighty whiteys scrubbing a bathroom (insert President of your choice!)
  • You will get to hear Matt's story of modern medicine in the ancient world (Advil anyone?)
  • Finally, you will meet a prostitute, a couple of Mormon elders, and a slew of other sinners
I loved this book. It covers some very serious issues with humor. Which Jesus do you follow? Is it the One and Only? If not, it should be!

In the salvation of man's soul there are 2 necessary parts: God's part and man's part. God's part is the big part, "For by grace you have been saved through faith, and that not of yourselves, it is the gift if God; not of works, that no man should glory" (Ephesians 2:8-9). The love which God felt for man led him to send Christ into the world to redeem man. The life and teaching of Jesus, the sacrifice on the cross, and the proclaiming of the gospel to men constitute God's part in salvation.



Though God's part is the big part, man's part is also necessary if man is to reach heaven. Man must comply with the conditions of pardon which the Lord has announced. Man's part can clearly set forth in the following steps:



Hear the Gospel. "How shall they call on him whom they have not believed? and how shall they believe him whom they have not heard? and how shall they hear without a preacher?" (Romans 10:14).



Believe. "And without faith it is impossible to be well pleasing unto him; for he that cometh to God must believe that he is, and that he is a rewarder of them that seek after him" (Hebrews 11:6).


Repent of past sins. "The times of ignorance therefore God overlooked; but now he commandeth men that they should all everywhere repent" (Acts 17:30).



Confess Jesus as Lord. "Behold here is water; What doth hinder me to be baptized ? And Philip said, if thou believeth with all thy heart thou mayest. And he answered and said, I believe that Jesus Christ is the Son of God" (Acts 8:36-37).



Be baptized for the remission of sins. "And Peter said unto them, Repent ye, and be baptized everyone of you in the name of Jesus Christ unto the remission of your sins and ye shall receive the gift of the Holy Spirit" (Acts 2:38).



Live a Christian life. "Ye are an elect race, a royal priesthood, a holy nation, a people for God's own possession, that ye may show forth the excellencies of him who called you out of darkness into his marvelous light" (1 Peter 2:9).

OPEN INVITATION
Now that you are aware of a church in the 20th century which is built according to the blue prints of Christ's original church, why not become a member of it? In becoming a member of it, you will be called upon to do nothing which you cannot read in the New Testament. You will then live and worship just as the apostle-guided Christians of the first century did.
Not only is this return to New Testament Christianity a wonderful basis upon which all believers in Christ can unite, it is absolutely solid ground. If we do just what our Lord commanded we know that our salvation is certain. Come with us as we go back to the Bible, back to Christ and his church!

If you desire finding a church home, please email me (using contact information at bottom left of blog) and I'll be happy to assist you!



Stop by and visit these other bloggers on tour this week! We all love comments!!

*Participants’ links (paste as is in the body of your post or update the links in your sidebar):

http://www.christiansciencefiction.blogspot.com"> Brandon Barr
http://www.AdventuresInFiction.blogspot.com/"> Keanan Brand
http://www.splashdownreviews.blogspot.com"> Grace Bridges
http://rbclibrary.wordpress.com/"> Beckie Burnham
http://valeriecomer.com/"> Valerie Comer
http://blog.rlcopple.com/"> R. L. Copple
http://www.the160acrewoods.com/"> Amy Cruson
http://csffblogtour.com/"> CSFF Blog Tour
http://word-up-studies.blogspot.com"> Stacey Dale
http://www.scificatholic.com/"> D. G. D. Davidson
http://scriptoriusrex.blogspot.com/"> Jeff Draper
http://projectinga.blogspot.com/"> April Erwin
http://askandrea.adamsweb.us/"> Andrea Graham
http://going-greene.blogspot.com/">Tori Greene
http://jessebecky.wordpress.com/"> Becky Jesse
http://crisjesse.wordpress.com"> Cris Jesse
http://www.spoiledfortheordinary.blogspot.com/"> Jason Joyner
http://www.molcotw.blogspot.com/"> Julie
http://carolkeen.blogspot.com/"> Carol Keen
http://krystisbooks.blogspot.com/"> Krystine Kercher
http://www.momofkings.com"> Dawn King
http://www.slygames.net/"> Leighton
http://rebeccaluellamiller.wordpress.com/"> Rebecca LuElla Miller
http://www.leastread.blogspot.com/"> John W. Otte
http://dragonbloggin.blogspot.com/"> Donita K. Paul
http://prochristroetlibertate.blogspot.com/"> Crista Richey
http://www.chawnaschroeder.blogspot.com/"> Chawna Schroeder
http://www.rachelstarrthomson.com/inklings/"> Rachel Starr Thomson
http://christiansf.blogspot.com/"> Steve Trower
http://frederation.wordpress.com"> Fred Warren
http://christian-fantasy-book-reviews.com/blog/"> Phyllis Wheeler
http://kmwilsher.blogspot.com/"> KM Wilsher


Bookmark and Share



Bookmark and Share

FIRST: Claim A Novel of Colorado by Lisa Bergren

It is time for a FIRST Wild Card Tour book review! If you wish to join the FIRST blog alliance, just click the button. We are a group of reviewers who tour Christian books. A Wild Card post includes a brief bio of the author and a full chapter from each book toured. The reason it is called a FIRST Wild Card Tour is that you never know if the book will be fiction, non~fiction, for young, or for old...or for somewhere in between! Enjoy your free peek into the book!

You never know when I might play a wild card on you!


Today's Wild Card author is:


and the book:


Claim: A Novel of Colorado (The Homeward Trilogy)

David C. Cook; New edition (June 1, 2010)



ABOUT THE AUTHOR:



Lisa T. Bergren is a best-selling author who offers a wide array of reading opportunities ranging from children’s books (God Gave Us Love and God Found Us You) and women’s nonfiction (Life on Planet Mom) to suspense-filled intrigue (The Gifted Trilogy) and historical drama. With more than thirty titles among her published works and a deep faith that has weathered dramatic career and personal challenges, Bergren is excited to add the Homeward Trilogy to her resume as she follows God’s direction in her writing career. Bergren lives in Colorado Springs, Colorado, with her husband Tim (a graphic design artist and musician) and their three children.

Visit the author's website.



Product Details:

List Price: $14.99
Paperback: 400 pages
Publisher: David C. Cook; New edition (June 1, 2010)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 143476706X
ISBN-13: 978-1434767066

AND NOW...THE FIRST CHAPTER:


1 August 1888

Gunnison, Colorado


“Keep doing that you’ll get yourself killed,” Nic said to the boy. Panting, Nic paused and wiped his forehead of sweat. For an hour now, as he moved sacks of grain from a wagon to a wheelbarrow and into the warehouse, he’d glimpsed the boy daring fate as he ran across the busy street, narrowly escaping horse hooves and wagon wheels.


“Where’s your mother?”


The brown-haired boy paused. “Don’t have a mother.”


“Well then, where’s your father?”


The boy cast him an impish grin and shrugged one shoulder.

“Around.”


“Is he coming back soon?” Nic persisted.


“Soon enough. You won’t tell ’im, will ya?”


“Tell him what?” Nic tossed back with a small smile. “Long as you stop doing whatever you’re not supposed to be doing.”


The boy wandered closer and climbed up to perch on the wagon’s edge, watching Nic with eyes that were as dark as his hair. Nic relaxed a bit, relieved that the kid wasn’t in imminent danger.


Nic hefted a sack onto his shoulder and carried it to the cart. It felt good to be working again. He liked this sort of heavy labor, the feel of muscles straining, the way he had to suck in his breath to heave a sack, then release it with a long whoosh. A full day of this sort of work allowed him to drop off into dreamless sleep—something he hungered for more than anything else these days.


The boy was silent, but Nic could feel him staring, watching his every move like an artist studying a subject he was about to paint. “How’d you get so strong?” the boy said at last.


“Always been pretty strong,” Nic said, pulling the next sack across the wooden planks of the wagon, positioning it. “How’d you get so fast?”


“Always been pretty fast,” said the boy, in the same measured tone Nic had used.


Nic smiled again, heaved the sack to his shoulder, hauled it five steps to the cart, and then dropped it.


“This your job?” the boy asked.


“For today,” Nic said.


Nic loaded another sack, and the boy was silent for a moment. “My dad’s looking for help. At our mine.”


“Hmm,” Nic said.


“Needs a partner to help haul rock. He’s been asking around here for days.”


“Miner, huh? I don’t care much for mining.”


“Why not? You could be rich.”


“More miners turn out dead than rich.” He winced inwardly, as a shadow crossed the boy’s face. It’d been a while since he’d been around a kid this age. He was maybe ten or eleven max, all wiry muscle and sinew. Reminded him of a boy he knew in Brazil.


Nic carried the next sack over to the wagon, remembering the heat there, so different from what Colorado’s summer held. Here it was bone dry. He was sweating now, after the morning’s work, but not a lot. In Brazil a man soaked his sheets as he slept.


“Listen, kid,” he said, turning back around to the wagon, intending to apologize for upsetting him. But the boy was gone.


Nic sighed and set to finishing his work. As the sun climbed high in the sky, he paused to take a drink from his canteen and eat a hunk of bread and cheese, watching the busy street at the end of the alleyway. He wondered if he’d see the boy again, back to his antics of racing teams of horses. The child was probably letting off steam, just as Nic had done all his life—he’d been about the child’s age when he’d first starting scrapping with others.


But that was in the past. Not since his voyage aboard the Mirabella had Nic indulged the need, succumbed to the desire to enter a fight. Several times now, he’d had the opportunity—and enough cause—to take another man down. But he had walked away. He knew, deep down he knew, that if he was ever to face his sisters, Odessa and Moira, again, if he was to come to them and admit he was penniless, everything would somehow be all right if he was settled inside. If he could come to a place of peace within, the kind of peace Manuel had known. It was the kind of thing that allowed a man to stand

up straight, shoulders back, the kind of thing that gave a man’s gut peace. Regardless of what he accomplished, or had in the past. Thing was, he hadn’t found that place of comfort inside, and he didn’t want what Manuel tried to sell him—God.


There had to be another way, another path. Something like this work. Hard manual labor. That might be what he needed most.


Nic heard a man calling, his voice a loud whisper, and his eyes narrowed as the man came limping around the corner, obviously in pain, his arm in a sling. “You, there!” he called to Nic. “Seen a boy around? About yea big?” he said, gesturing to about chest height.


“Yeah, he was here,” Nic called back. He set his canteen inside the empty wagon and walked to the end of the alleyway.


“Where’d he go?” the man said. Nic could see the same widow’s peak in the man’s brown hair that the boy had, the same curve of the eyes … the boy’s father, clearly.


“Not sure. One minute he was watching me at work, the next he was gone.”


“That’s my boy, all right.”


“I’ll help you find him.”


The man glanced back at him and then gave him a small smile. He stuck out his good arm and offered his hand. “I’d appreciate that. Name’s Vaughn. Peter Vaughn.”


“Dominic St. Clair,” he replied. “You can call me Nic.”


Peter smiled. His dimples were in the exact same spot as the boy’s. “Sure you can leave your work?”


“I’m nearly done. Let’s find your boy.”


“Go on,” Moira’s sister urged, gazing out the window. “He’s been waiting on you for a good bit now.”


“I don’t know what he sees in me,” Moira said, wrapping the veil around her head and across her shoulder again. It left most of her face visible but covered the burns at her neck, ear, and scalp. Did it cover them enough? She nervously patted it, making sure it was in place.


Odessa stepped away from washing dishes and joined her. “He might wonder what you see in him. Do you know what his story is? He seems wary.” Their eyes met and Odessa backtracked. “Daniel’s a

good man, Moira. I think highly of him. But I’d like to know what has burdened him so. Besides you.” She nudged her sister with her hip.


Moira wiped her hands on the dish towel and glanced out at him as he strode across the lawn with Bryce, Odessa’s husband. He was striking in profile, reminding her of the statues of Greek gods the French favored in their lovely tailored gardens. Far too handsome for her—since the fire, anyway. She shook her head a little.


“Moira.”


Irritated at being caught in thought, Moira looked at Odessa again.


“Trust him, Moira. He’s a good man. I can sense it.”


She nodded, but inwardly she sighed as she turned away and wrapped a scarf around her veiled head and shoulders. A good man. After Reid and Max and Gavin—could she really trust her choice in men? Odessa was fortunate to have fallen for her husband, Bryce, a good man through and through. Moira’s experiences with men had been less than successful. What made Odessa think this one was trustworthy?


But as Daniel ducked his head through the door and inclined it to one side in silent invitation to walk with him, Moira thought about how he had physically saved her more than once. And how his gentle pursuit both bewildered and calmed her. Daniel had done nothing to deserve her suspicions.


She moved over to the door. He glanced at her, and she noticed how his thick lashes made his brown eyes more pronounced. He shuffled his feet as if he were nervous. “You busy?” he asked.


“No.” Moira felt a nervous tension tighten her stomach muscles.


“Can we, uh …” His gaze shifted to Odessa, who quickly returned to her dishes. “Go for a walk?” he finally finished.


Moira smoothed her skirts and said, “I’d like that.” Then, meeting her sister’s surreptitious gaze, she followed him outside. It was a lovely day on the Circle M. The horses pranced in the distance. She could see her brother-in-law riding out with Tabito, the ranch’s foreman.


“So, you wanted to talk,” she ventured.


“There’s not a day that goes by that I don’t want to talk to you, Moira,” he said.


She looked up at him and then, when she saw the ardor in his gaze, she turned with a sigh.


“Don’t look away,” he whispered gently, pulling her to face him. He reached to touch her veil, as if he longed to cradle her cheek instead.


“No, Daniel, don’t,” she said and ran a nervous hand over the cover. He was tall and broad, and she did not feel physically menaced—it was her heart that threatened to pound directly out of her chest. Perhaps she wasn’t ready for this … the intimacies that a courtship brought.


She’d been dreaming about what it would be like to be kissed by him, held by him, but he never made such advances before. Never took the opportunity, leaving her to think that he was repulsed by

her burns, her hair, singed to just a few inches long, her past relationship with Gavin, or her pregnancy—despite what he claimed. Her hand moved to the gentle roundness of her belly, still small yet making itself more and more prominent each day. “I … I’m not even certain why you pursue me at all. Why you consider me worthy. ”


He seemed stunned by her words. “Worthy?” he breathed. He let out a hollow, breathy laugh and then looked to the sky, running a hand through his hair. He shook his head and then slowly brought his brown eyes down to meet hers again. “Moira,” he said, lifting a hand to cradle her cheek and jaw, this time without hesitation. She froze, wondering if he intended to kiss her at last. “I only hesitate because I am afraid,” he whispered.


“Afraid? You think I am not? I come to you scarred in so many ways, when you, you, Daniel, deserve perfection.…”


“No,” he said, shaking his head too. “It is I who carry the scars. You don’t know me. You don’t know who I am. Who I once was. What I’ve done …”


“So tell me,” she pleaded. “Tell me.”


He stared at her a moment longer, as if wondering if she was ready, wondering if she could bear it, and Moira’s heart pounded again. Then, “No. I can’t,” he said with a small shake of his head. He sighed heavily and moved up the hill. “Not yet.”


An hour after they began their search for Everett Vaughn, Peter sat down on the edge of the boardwalk and looked up to the sky. His face was a mask of pain. “That boy was hard to track when I wasn’t hurt.”


“He’ll turn up,” Nic reassured.


Peter nodded and lifted his gaze to the street.


“What happened to you?” Nic said gently, sitting down beside the man. His eyes scanned the crowds for the boy even as he waited for Peter’s response.


“Cave-in, at my mine. That’s why I’m here. Looking for a good man to partner with me. I’m onto a nice vein, but I’m livin’ proof that a man’s a fool to mine alone.” He looked at Nic and waited until he met his gaze. “You lookin’ for work?” He cocked his head to the side. “I’m offering a handsome deal. Fifty fifty.”


Nic let a small smile tug at the corners of his mouth. He glanced at the man, who had to be about his own age. There was an easy way about him that drew Nic, despite the pain evident in the lines of his face. “That is a handsome offer.” He cocked his own head. “But I don’t see you doing half the work, laid up like you are.”


“No, not quite. But I’ve already put a lot of work into it in the past three years, and I’m still good for about a quarter of the labor. To say nothing of the fact that my name’s on the claim.”


Nic paused, thinking about it, feeling drawn to help this man, but then shook his head. “I’m not very fond of small dark spaces.”


“So … make it bigger. Light a lamp.”


Nic shook his head, more firmly this time. “No. I’d rather find another line of work.”


Just then he spotted the boy, running the street again. “There he is,” Nic said, nodding outward. The boy’s father followed his gaze and with a grimace, rose to his feet. As they watched, the boy ran under a wagon that had temporarily pulled to a stop. Then he jumped up on the back of another, riding it for about twenty feet until he was passing by them. His face was a mask of elation.


“Everett! Ev! Come on over here!”


Everett’s eyes widened in surprise. He jumped down and ran over to them, causing a man on horseback to pull back hard on his reins and swear.


“Sorry, friend,” Peter said, raising his good arm up to the rider. The horseman shook his head and then rode on.


Peter grabbed his son’s arm and, limping, hauled him over to the boardwalk. “I’ve told you to stay out of the street.”


“So did I,” Nic said, meeting the boy’s gaze. The child flushed red and glanced away.


“We’d best be on our way,” Peter said. “Thanks for helpin’ me find my boy.” He reached out a hand and Nic rose to shake it. Peter paused. “It’s not often a man has a chance at entering a claim agreement once a miner has found a vein that is guaranteed to pay.”


Nic hesitated as he dropped Peter’s hand. “I’ve narrowly escaped with my life on more than one occasion, friend. I’m aiming to look up my sisters, but not from a casket.”


Peter lifted his chin, but his eyes betrayed his weariness and disappointment. What would it mean for him? For his boy, not to find a willing partner? Would they have to give up the mine just as they were finally on the edge of success? And what of the boy’s mother? His unkempt, too-small clothes told him Everett had been without a mother for some time.


He hesitated again, feeling a pang of compassion for them both. “Should I change my mind … where would I find you?”


A glimmer of hope entered Peter’s eyes. “A couple miles out of St. Elmo. Just ask around for the Vaughn claim up in the Gulch and someone’ll point you in our direction.” He reached out a hand. “I’d be much obliged, Nic. And I’m not half bad at cookin’ either. I’d keep you in grub. Give it some thought. But don’t be too put out if you get there, and I’ve found someone else.”


“Understood,” Nic said with a smile. “Safe journey.”


“And to you.” He turned away, tugging at his boy’s shoulder, but the child looked back at Nic, all big pleading eyes.


Hurriedly, Nic walked away in the opposite direction. He fought the desire to turn and call out to them. Wasn’t he looking for work? Something that would allow him to ride on to Bryce and Odessa’s ranch without his tail tucked between his legs? The man had said the mine was sure to pay.… I’m onto a nice vein.…


Was that a miner’s optimism or the truth?


Not yet?” Moira sputtered, following him. She frowned in confusion. He had been coaxing her forward, outward, steadily healing her with his kind attentions these last two months. But now it was as if they were at some strange impasse. What was he talking about? What had happened to him?


She hurried forward and grabbed his arm, forcing him to stop and turn again to face her. Her veil clung to her face in the early evening breeze. “Daniel.”


He slowly lifted his dark eyes to meet hers.


“This is about me, isn’t it?” she asked. “You attempt to spare my feelings but find me repulsive. I can hardly fault you, but—”


“No,” he said, with another hollow laugh. “Contrary to what you believe, Moira St. Clair, not everything boils down to you. You are braver than you think and more beautiful than you dare to believe. I believe we’re destined to be together.”


Moira held her breath. Then what—


“No,” he went on. “This is about something I need to resolve. Something that needs to be done, or at least settled in my mind, my heart, before I can properly court you.”


“What? What is it, Daniel?” she tried once more.


He only looked at her helplessly, mouth half open, but mute.


She crossed her arms and turned her back to him, staring out across the pristine valley, the land of the Circle M. It hurt her that he felt he couldn’t confide in her as she had with him. She stiffened when he laid his big hands on her shoulders. “I don’t need to be rescued, Daniel,” she said in a monotone. “God has seen me to this place, this time. He’ll see me through to the next … with or without you.”


“You don’t understand.”


“No. I don’t. We’ve been courting all summer, whether you realize it or not. And now you say that there is something else that needs to be resolved? You assume much, Daniel Adams. You think that I’ll wait forever?” She let out a scoffing laugh. “It’s clear you do not fear that any other man might pursue me. Not that I blame you …” She turned partly away and stared into the distance. “Please. Don’t let this linger on. I cannot bear it. Not if you do not intend to claim me as your own.”


He was silent for a long minute. Oh, that he would but turn her and meet her lips at last …


But he didn’t. “We both have a lot to think through, pray through, Moira,” he said quietly.


“Yes, well, let me know when that is accomplished,” she said over her shoulder, walking away as fast as she could, lest he see the tears that were already rolling down her cheeks.


©2010 Cook Communications Ministries. Claim by Lisa Bergren. Used with permission. May not be further reproduced. All rights reserved.



This is a book on my wish list. I have not received this book to review nor have I read this one.

Tuesday, June 22, 2010

On Sale Today! Wayfarer by RJ Anderson

It's onsale today and if you don't have a copy of this book yet, stop reading this now and run out and get it!

This is the second book in the Faery Rebels series by author RJ Anderson. Fifteen year old Linden is the star of this book (Knife was the star of Spell Hunter) and boy is she adventurous and daring!! It's all Timothy's fault though! Had he not gone and gotten himself kicked out of school, none of this would have ever happened. I don't feel that I can tell you a whole bunch about this book without giving a bunch of it away so I'm not going to say a whole lot. I do have to admit that I learned a lot more about the Faery land in this book and felt close to the characters while reading this book. It sucked me in and held me from beginning to end. I actually didn't want this book to end!

I highly recommend this book to readers of all ages. My copy is going to my student Haley. If I don't give it to her, she might just pummel me the first day of school...or haunt me for the rest of my life!

Whispers of Dawn, The Book Cellar, The Hungry Readers, My Own Little Corner of the World, KidzBookBuzz.com, Reading is My Superpower, Book Crumbs, Becky’s Book Reviews, Fireside Musings, A Christian Worldview of Fiction, Homeschool Book Buzz, Homespun Light, Book Review Maniac

Bookmark and Share

CSFF Blog Tour Day 2: Imaginary Jesus by Matt Mikalatos


Today, let's pause for a moment to get to know the author of Imaginary Jesus, Matt Mikalatos.


Many thanks to the author and publisher for providing a copy of this book to read and review!

To read the first chapter of Matt's great book, go to www.imaginaryjesus.com and click on the link in the middle of the page!

Tweet with him on Twitter!
@mattmikalatos.
"Like" him on Facebook!!

Read his blog for great stories but don't expect to find Matt...remember, he's imaginary! (Shhh...I don't think he realizes this yet!) LOL

Tomorrow, you can read a little about this book through my "official" review. I'm warning you, this guy had President Obama stripped down to his tighty whiteys cleaning his toilet. He's good....



*Participants’ links (paste as is in the body of your post or update the links in your sidebar):

http://www.christiansciencefiction.blogspot.com"> Brandon Barr
http://www.AdventuresInFiction.blogspot.com/"> Keanan Brand
http://www.splashdownreviews.blogspot.com"> Grace Bridges
http://rbclibrary.wordpress.com/"> Beckie Burnham
http://valeriecomer.com/"> Valerie Comer
http://blog.rlcopple.com/"> R. L. Copple
http://www.the160acrewoods.com/"> Amy Cruson
http://csffblogtour.com/"> CSFF Blog Tour
http://word-up-studies.blogspot.com"> Stacey Dale
http://www.scificatholic.com/"> D. G. D. Davidson
http://scriptoriusrex.blogspot.com/"> Jeff Draper
http://projectinga.blogspot.com/"> April Erwin
http://askandrea.adamsweb.us/"> Andrea Graham
http://going-greene.blogspot.com/">Tori Greene
http://jessebecky.wordpress.com/"> Becky Jesse
http://crisjesse.wordpress.com"> Cris Jesse
http://www.spoiledfortheordinary.blogspot.com/"> Jason Joyner
http://www.molcotw.blogspot.com/"> Julie
http://carolkeen.blogspot.com/"> Carol Keen
http://krystisbooks.blogspot.com/"> Krystine Kercher
http://www.momofkings.com"> Dawn King
http://www.slygames.net/"> Leighton
http://rebeccaluellamiller.wordpress.com/"> Rebecca LuElla Miller
http://www.leastread.blogspot.com/"> John W. Otte
http://dragonbloggin.blogspot.com/"> Donita K. Paul
http://prochristroetlibertate.blogspot.com/"> Crista Richey
http://www.chawnaschroeder.blogspot.com/"> Chawna Schroeder
http://www.rachelstarrthomson.com/inklings/"> Rachel Starr Thomson
http://christiansf.blogspot.com/"> Steve Trower
http://frederation.wordpress.com"> Fred Warren
http://christian-fantasy-book-reviews.com/blog/"> Phyllis Wheeler
http://kmwilsher.blogspot.com/"> KM Wilsher


Bookmark and Share

CFBA: Maid to Match by Deeanne Gist

This week, the


Christian Fiction Blog Alliance


is introducing


Maid to Match
Bethany House (June 1, 2010)


by
Deeanne Gist






ABOUT THE AUTHOR:



After a short career in elementary education, Deeanne Gist retired to raise her four children. Over the course of the next fifteen years, she ran a home accessory and antique business, became a member of the press, wrote freelance journalism for national publications such as People, Parents, Parenting, Family Fun, Houston Chronicle and Orlando Sentinel, and acted as CFO for her husband’s small engineering firm--all from the comforts of home.



Squeezed betwixt-and-between all this, she read romance novels by the truckload and even wrote a couple of her own. While those unpublished manuscripts rested on the shelf, she founded a publishing corporation for the purpose of developing, producing and marketing products that would reinforce family values, teach children responsibility and provide character building activities.



After a few short months of running her publishing company, Gist quickly discovered being a "corporate executive" was not where her gifts and talents lie. In answer to Gist’s fervent prayers, God sent a mainstream publisher to her door who licensed her parenting I Did It!® product line and committed to publish the next generation of her system, thus freeing Gist to return to her writing.



Eight months later, she sold A Bride Most Begrudging to Bethany House Publishers. Since that debut, her very original, very fun romances have rocketed up the bestseller lists and captured readers everywhere. Add to this two consecutive Christy Awards, two RITA nominations, rave reviews, and a growing loyal fan base, and you’ve got one recipe for success.



Her 2010 books, Beguiled and Maid To Match are now available for order.



Gist lives in Texas with her husband of twenty-seven years and their two border collies. They have four grown children. Visit her blog to find out the most up-to-the-minute news about Dee.







ABOUT THE BOOK



Falling in love could cost her everything.



From the day she arrived at the Biltmore, Tillie Reese is dazzled, by the riches of the Vanderbilts and by Mack Danvers, a mountain man turned footman. When Tillie is enlisted to help tame Mack's rugged behavior by tutoring him in proper servant etiquette, the resulting sparks threaten Tillie's efforts to be chosen as Edith Vanderbilt's lady's maid, After all, the one rule of the house is no romance below stairs.



But the stakes rise even higher when Mack and Tillie become entangles in a cover-up at the town orphanage. They could both lose their jobs, their aspirations...their hearts.



If you would like to read the first chapter of Maid to Match, go HERE.





Join this SPECIAL GETAWAY (Click on the Button):









This book is on my wishlist. I have not read it nor have I received a copy for review.

Bookmark and Share

Monday, June 21, 2010

Teaser Tuesday

Teaser Tuesdays is hosted by MizB over at Should Be Reading.

TEASER TUESDAYS asks you to:

Grab your current read. Let the book fall open to a random page.

Share with us two (2) “teaser” sentences from that page, somewhere between lines 7 and 12.
You also need to share the title of the book that you’re getting your “teaser” from … that way people can have some great book recommendations if they like the teaser you’ve given!

Please avoid spoilers!!

It doesn't help what my legs are doing now. I'm stumbling and falling a lot. In the end, I would never play high school sports again.


Taken from Against Medical Advice by James Patterson and Hal Friedman

I've just started reading this book and it has already taken a toll on me emotionally. I cannot imagine what it must have been like for Cory to find himself slowly changing at such a young age...and to know that something was definitely wrong.

Bookmark and Share

Kidz Book Buzz Tour: Wayfarer by RJ Anderson


I am super duper excited to be telling you about this book today (albeit a little late in the evening!)! RJ Anderson has done it again and written the perfect sequel to Faery Rebels: Spell Hunter! I reviewed Spell Hunter back in March and thought it was a good book. Wayfarer is so much better (as most sequels are!)! I highly recommend this book (4.8 stars!) to readers of all ages! You can't actually buy the book until tomorrow but I'm hoping that everyone who reads this will run out and purchase a copy!

Many thanks to HarperTeen and RJ Anderson for providing the ARC for me to review. I'm going to have to go and buy a final copy of this book as well. My ARC copy is being passed down to one of my students who just about pummeled me to get her hands on Spell Hunter when I brought it to school. I let her know I had this one and she "Squeeeeeed" very loudly and demanded to have my copy. She'll get it the first day back to school and I'm sure it will make her year! :) I owe many thanks to students such as this one who inspired me to read again as an adult!

I'm not going to say much more since it's getting late but stop back by tomorrow for a review! In the meantime, please visit with these bloggers who are also featuring this great book!



Whispers of Dawn, The Book Cellar, The Hungry Readers, My Own Little Corner of the World, KidzBookBuzz.com, Reading is My Superpower, Book Crumbs, Becky’s Book Reviews, Fireside Musings, A Christian Worldview of Fiction, Homeschool Book Buzz, Homespun Light, Book Review Maniac

Bookmark and Share

CSFF: Imaginary Jesus by Matt Mikalatos

Today the Christian Science Fiction and Fantasy book bloggers are introducing ">Imaginary Jesus by Matt Mikalatos.


Author Web site - http://imaginaryjesus.com/

This is a great book that will challenge even the strongest of minds. It is offensive, funny, challenging, and downright needed in our society today! Come back tomorrow for a bit more on our featured author, who is working on another book that will make an appearance in 2011! In the meantime, check out these other reviews....


*Participants’ links (paste as is in the body of your post or update the links in your sidebar):

Brandon Barr
Keanan Brand
Grace Bridges
Beckie Burnham
Valerie Comer
R. L. Copple
Amy Cruson
CSFF Blog Tour
Stacey Dale
D. G. D. Davidson
Jeff Draper
April Erwin
Andrea Graham
Tori Greene
Becky Jesse
Cris Jesse
Jason Joyner
Julie
Carol Keen
Krystine Kercher
Dawn King
Leighton
Rebecca LuElla Miller
John W. Otte
Donita K. Paul
Crista Richey
Chawna Schroeder
Rachel Starr Thomson
Steve Trower
Fred Warren
Phyllis Wheeler
KM Wilsher

Bookmark and Share